1924 to 1925

Match Reports by Peter Hall and Colin Gale

1924-1925

 

BATH CHRONICLE 16/8/1924

Nineteen players had turned out for the first training session, held at the Somerset Boys’ Home field:- H McDaniel, G Woodward, C E Carruthers, A E Anderson, H Slade, W J Banyard, P L Chapman, F Jones, R Mead, C Woodward, B Wright, J Sheppard, L W Bisgrove, H Vowles, F Rhymes, G Parfitt, F H Wood and G A Yearsley. For the pre-season trial, players changed at St. Mary’s Church House, Grove Street.

Training to continue each Tuesday and Thursday.

 

6/9/1924

v Leicester, Away. Lost 11-14. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, Chapman, C Woodward, Rhymes, Vowles, Wake, Bisgrove, Ealand, Morley, Carruthers, Mannings, T Rose, J Sheppard.

HAPPY HARRY

“Bath’s first try was gained by Harry Vowles from a throw out near the Leicester line. Rhymes threw a long pass out and Vowles took it on the run and was over in a flash. It proved to be the best try scored during the match. Vowles took the place kick and the ball struck the crossbar.”

Vowles must have been very pleased with his effort. It may be remembered that the previous season, he went through without a score until the very last match – and then scored twice. It was against – Leicester!

W J Gibbs scored the second. He dashed out of a loose scrum, picked up and dived over – almost in one motion. George Woodward converted. Ealand got the third, which brought the scores level.

Bath provided the Tigers with their winning opportunity. They had been twice sent back for early charges against the penalty taker. At the third infringement, Day was successful.

Most of the game was confined to the forwards. George Woodward had a useful game at full back, but was not quite so effective as Comm, his predecessor.

Former Bath captain, Norman Coates, ran the line for Leicester, in conjunction with Mr. W T Davis (Bath).

 

13/9/1924

v Aberavon, Home. Drawn 0-0. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Considine, Young, C Woodward, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, Ealand, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Rose, Chapman. Bath had hoped to include I J Pitman. In the event, Charlie Woodward filled his spot on the wing. Aberavon included two internationals and five County players. Aberavon’s Mainwaring sustained a fractured collar-bone in the first half. After the interval, the visitors largely confined Bath to their own half. Then: “Slade got the ball away to Considine, who made a fine run. He punted the ball over Griffith’s head and beat him in the run for the ball, but could not quite recover. Gibbs obtained possession and went on only to be brought down by several opponents on the goal line.”

Both sides remained evenly matched, and despite heroic efforts from Gibbs, Considine and Charlie Woodward, Bath were unable to break out. Towards the end, play became a bit too lively and vigorous. At the close, the match was being played out on or near the half way line, with Slade, Wake, Chaddock and Bisgrove making strenuous efforts to penetrate Aberavon’s solid defence.

 

20/9/1924

v United Services (Portsmouth), Away. Lost 3-32. Team:- G Woodward, Banks, Nudds, Young, C Woodward, Rhymes, Slade, Banyard, Brooks, Ealand, Morley, Carruthers, J Sheppard, Dunscombe, Chapman. Bath were depleted with six players on Somerset duty, against the All Blacks at Weston-super-Mare. The Services included England Caps W J A Davies and Lieut. Faithfull. Davies was in fine form, and contributed much to Bath’s downfall. Bath were 18-0 down by half-time.

 

27/9/1924

v Gloucester, Home. Won 16-7. Team:- G Woodward, W J Gibbs, S G U.Considine, Mills, Sergt. Jack Ridge, H Vowles, H Slade, H Wake, L W Bisgrove, Roger Ealand, R S Chaddock, C Carruthers, L W Humphries, T Rose, P L Chapman.

S G U Considine and Harry Slade had outstanding games in front of a crowd of 5000. George Woodward enjoyed a sound game at full back, Vowles was in good form at scrum half, and Wake, Rose and Chaddock showed well in the forwards.

 

4/10/1924

v Plymouth A., Away. Lost 0-11. Team:- G Woodward, Mills, Northway, H Richardson, Ridge, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Bisgrove, Humphries, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Rose, Chapman.

“The visitors’ defeat by the heavy margin of 11-0 was undoubtedly due to the fact that Considine was off the field through the second half owing to having strained a muscle, and that Chaddock, who injured his shoulder in the first half, but returned some time after the interval, was practically a “passenger,” his injury causing him considerable pain.” Despite being, effectively, reduced to 13 men for most of the game, Bath had a good share of the play. Considine was particularly prominent until his injury curtailed his activity.

“For a hard, serviceable worker, I commend Harry Vowles, the Bath scrum half, who frequently accomplished great things in defence against great odds.” (MARCUS – BATH CHRONICLE)

Bath’s train journey to Plymouth was particularly arduous. They left Bath Spa at 8.10 a.m. and did not arrive at Plymouth until 12.20. The return trip took 5 hours.

ALBY LEFT BEHIND!

On the outwards trip, Alby Hatherill, the trainer, was left behind at Exeter station. He emerged from the restaurant room with a cup of tea in his hand; he made a dash for the open carriage door, but a rather officious porter slammed it closed – just as poor Alby was about to launch himself into the air.

 

11/10/1924

v Newton Abbot, Home. Won 6-0. Team:- G Woodward, Chapman, Coombes, H Richardson, Banks, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Rose, Humphries. Described as “a very moderate display,” there was little to report. The visitors included six County men and Bath were weakened by the absence of Considine and Gibbs. Despite this there were good performances by Harry Richardson and Coombes at centre, and Vowles and Slade at half-back. Woodward consolidated his position at full back.

 

18/10/1924

v St Thomas Hospital, Home. Won 21-0. Team:- G Woodward, Considine, Coombes, H Richardson, Banks, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Humphries, Percy Chapman.

Try scorers:- Joe Richardson, Considine (3), and Harry Richardson. Conversions :- Slade (2), and Woodward. “On one occasion Considine ran through his opponents like an antelope.”

 

25/10/1924

v Cross Keys., Away. Lost 0-6. Team:- G Woodward, Considine, Coombes, H Richardson, Banks, Vowles, Slade, Adams, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Ealand, Humphries, Chapman. “The long grass made anything like good footwork almost impossible.”

“The first half had been contested with great vigour, but in a fine Rugby spirit.” However, Bath’s previously stout defence could not prevent two second half tries, as Cross Key’s threequarters got the better of the play. Bath forwards made a great effort, but they were outweighed by a hefty pack.

 

1/11/1924

v Clifton, Away. Lost 3-13. Team:- H McDaniel, Gibbs, Coombes, Banks, Anderson, Rhymes, Slade, Adams, Banyard, Skinner, Chaddock, Carruthers, Ealand, Seal, Chapman.

Bath had nearly half their regulars on County calls, and the final selection was made minutes before kick off.

A STRUGGLE IN THE MUD

It was a sodden and heavy ground. Bath got their first and only score after twenty minutes play: “Chaddock fielded a return from Curtis and ran across the field. He passed to Slade, who sent out to Gibbs. The Bath winger who, up to now, had had few opportunities, ran very strongly, beating all opposition, and scoring in a good position. Slade failed to gaol” (Half time 3-3)

The mudlarks continued into the second half, and the homesiders added 2 tries and a drop goal.

 

8/11/1924

v Old Edwardians Home. Won 19-5. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Coombes, Banks, Considine, Rhymes, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, Humphries, Chaddock, Carruthers, Adams, Rose, Chapman. Bath tries:- Considine (2), Gibbs (3). Woodward converted two.

A contemporary reporter said that it was an exhibition on how Rugby should be played: “The pace and guile of the Bath threequarters proved a winning factor.”

“Amongst the spectators were a number of students from the new Prior Park College, who intend to take up Rugger seriously in the near future.”

 

15/11/1924

v London Welsh Home. Won 16-3. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Coombes, H Richardson, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, G Adams, Carruthers, Roger Ealand, Humphries, Chapman. The game started 20 minutes late; the visitors had changed in the train and a fleet of taxi cabs ferried them to the Rec. “Bath were the first to become dangerous.” Harry Vowles started a dribble towards the Welsh line, but had insufficient support. Nevertheless, Bath scored within 5 minutes after Gibbs had run strongly. George Woodward added the extras. Seventeen minutes on and Considine increased the lead, the ball coming from Slade via Coombes. Considine brushed aside all opposition for a good try. (Half time 8-0)

The Exciles started well in the second spell, but it was again Considine: “He punted the ball over the visitors’ full back and going on caught it on the rebound to score a magnificent try , which George Woodward converted from a difficult angle. In a very few minutes Harry Vowles scored another try for Bath, seizing an opportunity and getting over in the right corner.” At the end Jones had an easy run in for the Exciles solitary try.

 

22/11/1924

v Bristol University Home. Won 26-3. Team:- G Woodward (Captain), C Woodward, Coombes, Banks, Anderson, Rhymes, C W Denny (Monkton Combe, Schoolmaster), F J Kearns (Old Monktonians), Jones, Dunscombe, Morley, Seal, Ealand, Humphries, Chapman

Bath fielded a scratch side against the students, and chalked up a 23 points margin. Bath tries from:- Seal, C Woodward, Coombes, Rhymes, Ealand, Morley. Conversions:- Woodward (4)

The crowd were treated to a fine exhibition of teamwork. The threequarters combined better than any previous match that season.

 

29/11/1924

v Pontypool: Home. Won 20-6. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, H Richardson, Considine, Denny, Vowles, Slade, Morley, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, W H Sheppard, Humphries, Chapman

“Behind the scrum, Bath were infinitely superior to Pontypool, and this was the real cause of their great victory. S.G.U. Considine and W.J.Gibbs, the wing men, played at the top of their form and their work, both in attack and defence, was ably backed up by Harry Richardson and Banks, the centres. I have not seen Banks play a better game……” (Bath Chronicle 1/12/1924)

Bath tries:- Gibbs (2), and Considine (2). Woodward converted all four tries.

Considine was at his brilliant best.

 

6/12/1924

v Bristol: Away. Won 11-7. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, H Richardson, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Humphries, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, W H Sheppard, Rose, Chapman. 1000 supporters travelled to Bristol. Bristol had four top players at the international trial.

“Bath were doing a good deal of attacking now, and it seemed that they could not be kept out for long. This proved to be the case, because six minutes from the start Considine scored a splendid try near the posts. Handling brought the ball to Harry Richardson who “sold the dummy” before passing to Considine. It was not a perfect pass, but Considine got it and cut through in great fashion.”

Woodward goaled. Thirty minutes into the game and Vowles got Bath’s next score: “Harry received from a scrum and finding the ball difficult to pick up, he dribbled half the length of the field, beating the defence and scoring midway between the posts and the flag.

Chantrell opened Bristol’s account with a second half drop goal. Then Bath’s Harry Richardson scored a lovely try after a strong run. In the latter stages Quick scored an unconverted try for Bristol.

Bath Chronicle 6/12/1924

”I was very much impressed with the display given by young Ralph Banks.

On one occasion particularly, he showed real genius.

Instead of passing out to Gibbs, who was closely watched, he gave to Harry Richardson, thus drawing the defence off Gibbs who, when he did get the ball, raced away in his inimitable style and scored.

Bank’s play generally was excellent; he seemed to fill a niche in the threequarter line, and I think the Club Committee acted wisely in selecting him for the game at Bristol, today.”

Again,

“That pass inside by Banks showed a little bit of ‘class,’ a little bit of thinking and was a little bit out of common or garden rugby. Banks is doing splendidly, and what is more will do better still. He handles the ball with great certainty, and gives beautiful passes. As a schoolboy I remember he was a mighty kick and often times his strong punts are useful now. George Gray, George Burden, Billy Fear and other Larkhallites are, I imagine, mighty proud of him, and they have cause to be.”

 

Bath Chronicle 8/12/1924

“Ralph Banks once more proved what a fine three quarter he is becoming. He handled like a veteran and used his brains to create openings.

Harry Richardson has returned to form with a bang, and personally I consider that he was the best centre on the field today at Bristol and his partner, Ralph Banks, is certainly ‘the’ find of the season.”

Bath backs were in good form. It had been a fine all-round display, whilst Considine was – magnificent.

 

“After the match the Bristol supporters Club entertained the teams and their officials and the officials of the Bath Supporters Club to dinner, which was followed by a visit to the Hippodrome.”

 

The Bristol Match programme contained the following limerick:

 

Young Considine takes the Bath Bun. He starts like a shot from a gun. His manner elusive is very conducive to scoring. Just watch how it’s done!

 

13/12/1924

v Richmond: Home. Won 16-9. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, H Richardson, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Len Humphries, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, W H Sheppard, Rose, Chapman.

Actually, it was a missed score, which is particularly worthy of note: “Considine executed a brilliant solo movement almost from the half line. Man after man he beat, but had the chagrin of being tackled by Palmer when he was over the line. It was a great effort, and deserved a better fate.”

“Although the visitors kept a close watch on the Bath three-quarters, they were too strong for them and , guided by ‘S.G.U.’ scored through Gibbs (2), Richardson and Rose, with two being converted by Woodward.”

 

20/12/1924

v Freethy’s XV: Home. Won 15-6. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, H Richardson, Pitman, Vowles, Slade, Humphries, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Rose, Chapman.

Bath were without Considine, who was Reserve for the International Trial. Sheppard and Chapman were not fit. Bath were happy to include I J Pitman for his first game since breaking a leg, two seasons previously. The kick-off was delayed by half an hour. It was necessary for the visitors to change on the train. They were one man short, and veteran, F J Cashnella came on to make up their numbers. Bath tries:- Harry Richardson, Gibbs, and Joe Richardson. Woodward converted all three. Woodward gave a polished display at full-back.

 

Mr. Freethy’s XV. Selected side:- Tom Jones, Jim John, Cyril Walters, *D Hunt-Davies, +J Glyn Jones, +T.Harris, C Heard, Capt. H. Rawlings (Capt.), *Gwilym Michael, + J Hopkins, * Ivor Thomas, * Bob Randall, * J Jones, * W Perry, +T Evans.

* International. + County.

 

Albert Freethy was a particularly distinguished referee. He was a schoolmaster at Cwt Sart School, Neath; his playing career was cut short with injury. He had been an outstanding Youth coach. He refereed 16 Internationals, six Varsity games, and was the first Welsh official to referee English Club matches. He had the somewhat unenviable task of sending off, All Black Cyril Brownlie, the first sending off in any International match. He refereed the Olympic Games Rugby Final in 1924. At one time he was a Welsh Selector.

 

24/12/1924

v Cardiff: Away. Lost 6-22. Team:- Harry McDaniel, Gibbs, Banks, H Richardson, Considine, Slade, Fred Rhymes, Vowles, Bisgrove, Wake, Morley, Carruthers, Mannings, Dunscombe, Humphries. Bath were unable to field a truly representative team. In a makeshift selection, Harry Vowles played at outside-half and Harry Slade “played as a rover.”

CONSIDINE SCORES BATH’S TRIES.

“Before the interval Considine scored a magnificent try for Bath, beating half a dozen opponents and being pulled down three times before he carried the ball over the line.” (Half-time Cardiff 10, Bath 3)

“Soon after the interval Johnson got an unconverted try for Cardiff, and then Considine scored another brilliant try, after running practically the whole length of the field. He intercepted a pass close to his own line, dodged Collins, the Cardiff full back and ran like a ‘flash.’ It was a great effort and was loudly applauded by the spectators.”

However, Cardiff came back and the final tally was 2 goals, 4 tries to Cardiff, and two tries for Bath. Considine was widely acclaimed as the hero of the match.

“By far the most outstanding man of the day was S.G.U Considine, whose dashes on the left wing were things of joy. He was a constant thorn in the Cardiff side, and his try was one of the best seen on the Cardiff Arms Park for many a day.”(Cardiff Evening Express)

 

26/12/1924

v Old Blues: Home. Won 10-8. Team:- G Woodward, Nudds, Banks, H Richardson, Pitman, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, A Morley, N Poett (Downside), Mannings, Sheppard, Chapman.

A crowd of around 7500 watch this holiday win. Both tries were scored by Joe Richardson and Woodward added the extras. Centres Harry Richardson and Ralph Banks, had excellent games, “their tackling being great.”

 

27/12/1924

v Gloucester: Away. Lost 0-21. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, Russell, Nudds, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Morley, Poett, Seal, Dunscombe, Chapman.

Bath were forced to make a number of changes, and went down heavily at Kingsholm on a rain soaked pitch. Many of the Gloucester faithful were put off by the rain, and the attendance was barely 1500.

It was well into the first half, before Gloucester’s spate of 4 tries; Bath found themselves 0-12 down at the interval. Bath forwards were ineffective and consequently, the threequarters could not get into their stride. “The ground was now reduced to a quagmire, the players being covered in mud from head to foot, and the game slackened off.” Then after 15 minutes of the second half, George Woodward was injured and had to withdraw. Gloucester then gained the ascendancy, with a total of 6 tries and a penalty to nil.

 

A HAPPY NEW YEAR!

“A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS New Year to all Bath Rugby men; let’s hope the Bath Club makes a better start of the New Year than the weather has. Both finished 1924 pretty badly. The display given by Bath at Gloucester was about on a par with the weather. What a day! And from Bath’s point of view, what a game!”

 

3/1/1925

v Richmond: Home. Won 6-5. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, H Richardson, Considine, Rhymes, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Humphries, W H Sheppard, Mannings, Rose, Chapman.

Match was arranged with a morning kick-off so that the players could attend the England v New Zealand International.

“Tom Rose broke away from a line-out, and gave to Considine. The Bath captain went away at full speed, and dodging one or two, and handing off others, scored a good try. Woodward failed.” (Half-time 3-0) Just into the second half, and Considine ran round the defending full back for a second try.

Richmond attacked hotly, Napier breaking through top send in Aslett, with Thomas converting.

“Bath deserved their win, if only by one point.

The wind spoilt what would have been a ripping game.

Under the circumstances it was not at all bad.

Considine’s tries were gems.”

 

10/1/1925

v Edgware: Away. Won 13-0. Team:- C Woodward, L H Scott, R Banks, Nudds, A E Anderson, Rhymes, Slade, J Sheppard, R Ealand, R S Chaddock, L Seal, C Mannings, P Dunscombe, P Chapman, A Morley. Referee:- Mr. Potter Gridin.

Bath were without Considine, Sheppard, H Richardson, W J Gibbs, L J Richardson, T Rose and L W Bisgrove – all on County duty at Plymouth.

Right from the start, Nudds sent a long pass to Anderson, who ran half the length of the field for a good try. Jack Sheppard was next, when he rolled over for a try among a bundle of forwards. Slade just managed his conversion – the wet ball slithering over the crossbar. Bath continued to move the ball, with Harry Slade the pivot for most of Bath’s openings. Finally, Scott held a nice pass and cross kicked for Anderson’s second score. Slade added the extras.

LUCKY 13 ?

It was Bath’s 13th win of the season, and they won by 13 points!

 

17/1/1925

v Cross Keys: Home. Lost 8-12. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, R Banks, Denny, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Humphries, W H Sheppard, Chapman.

BATH CHRONICLE 24/1/1925

“Ronald Banks was chiefly prominent last Saturday for the amount of defensive work he put in. No one showed more pluck than he did in tackling and in going down to stop those tremendous Keys forwards, and some of his kicking was splendid.”

Valiant defence kept the visitors in check in the opening stages, but Cross Keys were winning ball and moving well in the backs. After a good heel, Fairfax feinted to pass, and dropped a neat goal. Near half time, Burnett scored under the Bath posts for Williams to convert. (Half time Cross Keys 9, Bath 0)

“Bath at last got a rare good try started by Wake at half way. Humphries received and ran very intelligently to Williams, the full back. Then he gave to Joe Richardson, who had to run from the 25, and no one could catch him.” Although closely marked, Vowles did splendidly in setting up breaks on the blind side. His industry brought just rewards, when he sent in Gibbs, who raced to touch down behind the posts. Woodward converted. Considine had another great run, but was unable to gather, after kicking over the full back’s head. Bath were getting the best of the play, until Cross Key’s Hicks secured at a line out, to lunge over for a soft try. Time had run out for Bath, and the ground record had been snatched away from them.

 

24/1/1925

v London Welsh: Away. Won 8-0. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Ralph Banks, Jack Banks, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, J Sheppard, C N Mannings, R S Chaddock, C E Carruthers, P Chapman and Ealand.

EXCILES ECLIPSED

“The query, which no one seemed able to answer was how would the eclipse effect the match. Herne Hill if one went by the charts, seemed right in the path of the darkening of the sun. However Bath hoped for the best and as an early start was to be made, it was hoped that the game would be finished in time.”

Lunch was taken at Paddington Station. By coincidence, they were in adjacent company with both Bristol City and Swindon Town soccer teams.

The game got under way in ideal weather, but with a meagre crowd.

“It was ding dong if unscientific football with the balance of play in the homesters’ hands.”

(Half time 0-0)

“The eclipse made itself seen after the interval and it became very misty.”

“Success was to come for following a nice touch by Vowles there was a dribble by the Bath pack. Roberts lost the ball and Ealand dived on it, just in time and scored. Woodward did not goal.

Marsden-Jones the International, was leading the home octet; finally Bath were in their stride and attacked fiercely. Considine got in his dazzling runs. Frequently there was a break by the Welsh, but Banks nailed Thomas when the latter was making straight for the line. Bath’s tackling was immense. Slade gained applause for a clever bit of work. He broke clean away, but was not quite fast enough. His pass to Gibbs was adjudged forward. Vowles sold a beautiful dummy and scored. Woodward converted. It was a very fine effort. He drew the defence right and left brilliantly, and his great solo effort was the feature of the match. The London men were now worn down and could now do very little.”

 

31/1/1925

v R.A.F.: Home. Won 9-3. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, R Banks, Anderson, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, Morley, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, W H Sheppard, Humphries

Play was fast and open. “The Bath captain got a wonderful try just after being fed by Anderson. He gave Scott the dummy very sweetly, and then did ditto to Casey, and romped home with a capital try.” The “flying men” came back with a try, whilst both Chaddock and Bisgrove were off injured. Upon their return, a good effort by the forwards led to a try by Bisgrove. Woodward failed with another conversion attempt, but was successful with a penalty kick just on half time. Rain fell heavily throughout the second half and the ground was in a dreadful state. In these difficult conditions, there was no further score.

 

7/2/1925

v Newton Abbott: Away. Won 8-6. Team:- G Woodward, Pitman, R Banks, Anderson, C Woodward, Rhymes, Nudds, Carruthers (Capt.), Mannings, Humphries, Morley, Seal, Ealand, Dunscombe and J Sheppard. Bath Tries:- Mannings and Pitman. Woodward converted Manning’s try.

Bath Chronicle 9/2/1925

“One the day’s play there were only two weak spots in the Bath team, but I mention this not to signal out individual failures so much as to draw attention to the fact that both the players referred to were really not in a fit state of health to play. I J Pitman who was on the wing, with Ralph Banks as his centre, received the ball much more frequently than was the case on the other occasions on which he has played for Bath this season, and it was delightful to watch his play. He frequently beat his opponents and several times exhibited a rare turn of speed. His try was the result of a fine piece of play, and it was the deciding factor in Bath’s victory. Another player who was a great success was A E Anderson who did some very clever work, but Ralph Banks was probably the best of the three-quarters, his tackling and kicking having much to do with the result.”

14/2/1925

v Llanelli: Away. Lost 5-11. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, R Banks, C Woodward, Pitman, Vowles, Slade, Seal, Bisgrove, Ealand, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Dunscombe, Morley.

Llanelly were extremely heavy at forward, but Gibbs, Banks and Woodward defended strongly.

Banks kept his wing man in the game with fluid handling. The youngster’s kicking out of hand was excellent. Bath’s only try followed from persistent forward effort, allowing Harry Vowles to pick up and score, and for Woodward to convert.

 

21/2/1925

v Edgware: Home. Won 37-6. Team:- G Woodward, Pitman, Banks, C Woodward, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Ealand, Humphries, Morley. It was the Londoner’s first visit to Bath.

“Ten minutes from the end, after a fine bit of play by Banks, Charlie Carruthers went over for a beautiful try near the posts, but George Woodward failed to convert.”

At the end: “Chaddock broke through and got the ball to Carruthers, who went over for another try, which Banks converted.”

Bath’s final try count was:- Considine, Wake, Pitman, Chaddock, C Woodward, G Woodward, Carruthers (2), and Pitman. Conversions:- Woodward (4), Banks (1)

 

7/3/1925

v Plymouth Albion Home. Won 25-3. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, Pitman, Considine, Vowles, Denny, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Humphries, Ealand.

“The overwhelming defeat which Bath imposed on Plymouth Albion on the Recreation ground on Saturday may be attributed very largely to their superiority outside the scrum and especially to the fleetness of their three-quarters, who probably form the fastest line in the country today. Any doubt as to the wisdom of playing I.J.Pitman as a centre to S.G.U.Considine on the left wing was dispelled during the course of that match, for as the game progressed, the ex-international winger fitted more and more into the scheme of things, and what is more, he often did some good tackling. He and Considine were frequently in the limelight. They are a very fleet pair and generally worked with a thorough understanding. The exceptions were when, on a few occasions, Pitman flung a pass wildly, but one cannot overlook the fact that when this occurred, he was hampered by the close attention of at least two of his opponents. Indeed the Plymouth defence seemed to concentrate on Considine, Pitman and W. J. Gibbs, and this afforded an opportunity to Harry Vowles and Ralph Banks to frequently cut through in the centre. Bank’s try was a marvel of speed, and quite apart from his other fine qualifications as a centre, he established himself as a fitting partner to the other fleet-footed three-quarters.” (Bath Chronicle 9/3/1925)

Bath tries:- Wake, Gibbs (2), Vowles, Banks, Considine (2). Woodward converted two.

 

14/3/1925

v Newport Home. Won 6-3. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, P Hope, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Humphries, Morley. In the absence of I J Pitman, the former skipper Philip Hope took the centre berth. It was a welcome re-appearance after three years in Canada. He had last played on 4th March 1922. He took the field amid shouts of : “Good old Philip.”

Bath played splendid rugby to beat Newport by three points in front of an estimated 7000 spectators.

Considine scored another great try. Philip Hope had gathered beautifully, and a well timed pass sent Considine away at great speed, to score amid “tumultuous cheering.” (Half time 3-0)

Newport were rewarded when Dowdale dummied to pass and cut through a number of defenders to equalise. Then there was a great cheer as Mannings was credited with a try as several Bath players dived for the corner. “There were some rare tussles just in front of the stand, and Bath’s forwards were sticking it well, and Vowles did capitally in dribbling. The line out work of the home men just now was great.” “Considine came in for some rough handling and it was natural for the crowd to show their disapproval.” It had been a great game, with the result in doubt right to the end.

BATH CHRONICLE 16/3/1925: “It was a great day for West of England Rugby last week, for Bath beat Newport, Bristol beat Pontypool, and Gloucester Llanelly.” It was Bath’s first win over Newport.

 

21/3/1925

v Llanelly. Won 5-3 : G Woodward, Gibbs, Banks, Hope, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Humphries, Morley. Llanelly fielded nine internationals.

“Young Ralph Banks once more fully proved his ability as a centre, and it would be an extraordinary man who could do better.”

“At last Bath took the lead, mainly through a magnificent bit of play by Considine. The Bath captain had beaten several opponents, and then kicked, the ball passing over the line for Len Humphries to dash in and score. Ralph Banks took the place kick and goaled with ease, and thus Bath led by two points.”

 

Bath Herald 28/3/1925

“It is pretty evident after last Saturday that the reputation gained by Considine and Gibbs is getting well known. They were given very little rope on Saturday and whatever has been said against it, Hope did quite right in going through on his own. The Bath centres might easily do more of it now. With everyone as it were, waiting on Consi and Gibbs, the centres should get on with it.

Ralph Banks knew this when he got in one of very best runs on Saturday. Everybody was going for Considine and the centre made pretty well half the length of the ground.

It was fortunate Considine entrusted Banks with the kick for goal. Banks used to kick plenty in the Schools’ Union and for the Trams. Woodward might very well take the long ones and Banks those close in.”

28/3/1925

v Pontypool. Away, Lost 0-12. Team:- G Woodward, Hope, Banks, Northway, Considine, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Chaddock, Carruthers, Mannings, Ealand, Chapman.

IN THE SOUP AT PONTYPOOL

BATH’S POOR GAME ON SATURDAY

LOST CHANCES

“The victory in Wales which Bath has been looking for for some seasons as far off as ever.” The Chronicle headlines accurately describe Bath’s worst performance of the season, in front of a sparse crowd. Towards the end, the spectators seemed more interested in the relayed updates of Cardiff City’s cup match with Nottingham!

“Bath’s forwards were giving a very lifeless sort of exhibition. In fact, by now they had cracked up, and Ponty were having all the game.” “In the second half play was very much confined to Bath’s half of the ground. The Pool forwards had got the measure of Bath, who certainly had an off day.”

 

4/4/1925

v United Services 4th April 1925 Won 18-10

Team regarded as one of the strongest fielded during this era: G Woodward, S G U Considine, I J Pitman (England), R Banks, W J Gibbs, J R Wheeler (Ireland), H Slade, P Chapman, L J Richardson, C E Carruthers, A Morley, L Seal, C N Mannings, L W Humphries, H B L Wake.

“It was Bath’s staying powers in the second half that won for them the game, and this was all the more creditable seeing that they were without Ralph Banks after the interval. I was glad to learn afterwards that the injury to this promising young player was not serious and that he will be able to play next Saturday against Moseley. In the second half Bath scored four more tries through Mannings, Gibbs, Considine, and Joe Richardson, and though the visitors frequently attacked they were well held by Bath, whose tackling was generally splendid.” (Bath Chronicle 4/4/1925)

Bath tries:- Considine (3), Mannings, Gibbs and Joe Richardson.

BATH CHRONICLE “Banks had a unique experience, for so young a player, for he had an International outside half with him and against him. He was certainly in good company, but his display was quite on a par with theirs. No more popular player in the Bath side could be named than Banks, and it will be a great disappointment if he be not fit for the holiday games, and for the greatest of the lot-the Bristol game. Happily it was only a minor injury he is suffering from-a muscle of the back bruised.”

 

11/4/1925

v Moseley. Home, Won 17-14. Team:- G Woodward, W J Gibbs, H W H Considine, F B Simpson, A E Anderson, F Rhymes, H Slade, H B L Wake, L W Bisgrove, L J Richardson, A Morley, C E Carruthers, C Mannings, L W Humphries, P Chapman. It was a sunny afternoon, with an appreciative crowd of about 4000.

COMFORTABLE WIN FOR THE HOME SIDE

Bath tries from:- Wake, Morley, Humphries, Gibbs, and another, but the scorer was not identified. Slade converted one. W J Gibb’s try was a particularly fine effort, and there were “tumultuous cheers” as he grounded the ball under the posts. Bath owed their victory to good forward play. Bert Anderson put in some nice runs, but it was felt that Harry Slade did too much kicking, and the backs were generally deprived of the ball.

 

13/4/1925

v O.M.Ts. Home, Lost 3-5. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, H W H Considine, H Richardson, Anderson, Vowles, Slade, Wake, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Morley, Gould, Seal, Humphries, W H Sheppard. It was felt that Bath should have won this game. The Old Merchant Taylors Club had been prospering, and regularly put seven teams into the field. Their new ground at Teddington was one of the finest in the country.

 

14/4/1925

v Leicester. Home, Drawn 10-10. Team:- G Woodward, Gibbs, R Banks, A V Twose, C Woodward, Chaddock, Vowles, Slade, Bisgrove, L J Richardson, Wake, Carruthers, Seal,

R M Ealand, Chapman. Attendance around 3500. It was the last game of Leicester’s Easter Tour, and they had sustained a number of injuries.

“The visitors did most of the attacking in the first half, but although they got the ball out to their backs very frequently from the tight scrums, the combination of their outsides was continually broken up by the Bath forwards and occasionally by Harry Vowles, who was playing a fine game.”

However, it was Leicester who opened the scoring with Buckinghams’s drop goal, followed with a try by Atkins. Percy Chapman crossed for Bath’s first try just before the interval. (Half time 3-7)

Bath strong restart yielded a try for Gibbs, but Leicester again moved further ahead when Bryson scored “a capital try.” There was a period of exciting play in which Bath gained the ascendancy, crowning their efforts when Gibbs dropped a match-saving goal. “There was a grim fight for the leading points, but no further score.”

 

18/4/1925

v Bristol. Home, Lost 3-5. Team:- G Woodward, W J Gibbs, R S Chaddock, A V Twose, P P Hope, Vowles, Slade, L W Bisgrove, L J Richardson, H B Wake, C E Carruthers, A Morley, L W Humphries, W H Sheppard, P Chapman. Attendance 6000. As the Civic Dignitaries took their seats, S G U Considine was greeted with an extra-special cheer, when he appeared on crutches.

Prowse scored for Bristol after fifteen minutes, for Hore to convert. It was a hard fought first half, and the second half was equally exciting. “The Bath winger was impeded, and the referee awarded a penalty try, which Twose failed to convert.” Bath had lost by 1 goal to one try.

 

“The players were keen, sometimes vigorous, but the game was fought in the best of sporting spirits.

Bristol had much the better of the game in the first half, and that they failed to score more than a goal during that period was a great tribute to Bath’s splendid tackling.””

Both teams and representatives of the Supporters’ Clubs enjoyed a post match dinner at the Red House. They then adjourned to a “smoker” at the Drill Hall. A skittles match was won by the Bristol players.

 

BATH CHRONICLE 25/4/1925

“Young Ralph Banks, who may be regarded as one of the most promising products of junior football in Bath, has also been greatly missed since his accident.

He has been a great strength to the three-quarter line, and early in the season forced his way into the team by sheer ability.

There have been very few of the players who have not suffered from either injury or illness, and some of them have pluckily turned out before they were fit-so keen were they to serve their Club in a time of adversity.”

 

25/4/1925

v Aberavon. Away, Lost 9-40. Team:- A Matthews, W J Gibbs, G Woodward, A V Twose, A F Lace, A Dixon, S Watts, H B L Wake, L Seal, F J Love, E Crew, G Francis, R Pocock, and guest players :- R Fryer, and G Chamberlain of Mountain Ash.

Only two or three regular first-team players made themselves available, several individuals advising non-availability on the Friday night. Consequently, the Secretary was engaged “until a late hour” trying to find replacements.

 

“A few minutes before the train left Bath the intimation was received that one of the forwards had “cried off,” and at the very last moment a junior player, who happened to be in the vicinity of the station, was pressed into service.”

The story goes, that this fellow had been sent out by his mother to buy sausages for lunch, and he was spirited away to Aberavon, sausages and all. “I often wonder what the family did about lunch.”

 

For Bath, Twose scored and converted a good try and Woodward dropped a goal. Tragically, Aberavon ran in 12 tries, two of which were converted.

Scorers:

TRIES: S.G.U. CONSIDINE 23 R. BANKS 1,W.J. GIBBS 18 L.W. BISGROVE 1, L. J. RICHARDSON 7 R.S. CHADDOCK 1, H. VOWLES 5 P.L. CHAPMAN 1

H.B.L. WAKE 4 T. ROSE 1, H. RICHARDSON 4 G. WOODWARD 1, I J PITMAN 4 F. RHYMES 1, C.N. MANNINGS 3 L.T.SEAL 1, L.W. HUMPHRIES 3 J. SHEPPARD 1, A. MORLEY 3 A.V. TWOSE 1, R.M. EALAND 3 C.A. YOUNG 1, C.E. CARRUTHERS 2 PENALTY TRY 1, C. WOODWARD 2, A.P. COOMBES 2, A.E. ANDERSON 2

 

GOALS:-

G.WOODWARD 30 F. RHYMES 1, H.SLADE 6 A.V. TWOSE 1, R. BANKS 4

 

PENALTY GOALS H.SLADE 2 G.WOODWARD 1

 

DROP GOALS G.WOODWARD 1 W.J. GIBBS 1

Highest Scorers: G Woodward 70 points

S.G.U. Considine 69 points

W.J. Gibbs 58 points

60 PLAYERS APPEARED FOR THE Club, of whom 20 played once only.

County players:

* H.B.L. WAKE 6 (all games)

* L.W. BISGROVE 5

* W.J. GIBBS 5

L.J. RICHARDSON 5

* S.G.U.CONSIDINE 4

* T. ROSE 4

H. VOWLES 3

H. RICHARDSON 3

* R. S. CHADDOCK 2

G. WOODWARD 1

H. SLADE 1

(* Signifies – played against the all-conquering All Blacks.)

 

This page was added on 13/05/2014.

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